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Deckhand
posted
Can anyone tell me the differance in fighting a large tuna between a 6455xxxh at 5 1/2 ft and the same rod in 6 1/4 ft?

Samada
 
Posts: 24 | Registered: 10 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
posted Hide Post
The longer rod is better for keeping the line from rubbing the sides or under the boat, At the rail you have less chance of line rubbing the boat. getting over the anchor at the bow.


sweet charity
 
Posts: 446 | Registered: 27 April 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
posted Hide Post
Thank you, that sounds reasonable.
 
Posts: 24 | Registered: 10 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
CharkBait Staff
Captain
Picture of Chark
posted Hide Post
Generally greater leverage on a shorter rod than a long rod, easier fight. But, in the past very few years great success has been made with some specific actions, such as Calstar'770 series and Seekers 2x4, basically a 2X tip with 4x aft section of the rod. So, you have the distance from the boat benefit CV mentioned as well as a lighter tip to aid in flinging a bait. Getting around obstacles is easier with the longer rod, certainly. But leverage also is an important consideration. I could be wrong, but experience plays a big factor in one's ability to make the most of the longer rods for BIG tuna. Seeker's 6463XXXXHAR-WO is in my thinking a classic rod for taking cow size tuna and one that can be used to great effect by even a novice, while the 2X4 probably is best in the hands of someone with some experience and a more aggressive style of fishing. That's just an opinion, and others are more than welcome to educate and correct me based upon their own observations and experience.

GS<
MS
 
Posts: 1539 | Registered: 18 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
Captain
Picture of big gabe
posted Hide Post
longer the rod you can holds it away from the boat. but shorter the rod more leverage,,,,,


TEAM
976-TUNA
 
Posts: 177 | Registered: 23 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
posted Hide Post
Thank you, you have been very helpfull.

Sam

quote:
Originally posted by Chark:
Generally greater leverage on a shorter rod than a long rod, easier fight. But, in the past very few years great success has been made with some specific actions, such as Calstar'770 series and Seekers 2x4, basically a 2X tip with 4x aft section of the rod. So, you have the distance from the boat benefit CV mentioned as well as a lighter tip to aid in flinging a bait. Getting around obstacles is easier with the longer rod, certainly. But leverage also is an important consideration. I could be wrong, but experience plays a big factor in one's ability to make the most of the longer rods for BIG tuna. Seeker's 6463XXXXHAR-WO is in my thinking a classic rod for taking cow size tuna and one that can be used to great effect by even a novice, while the 2X4 probably is best in the hands of someone with some experience and a more aggressive style of fishing. That's just an opinion, and others are more than welcome to educate and correct me based upon their own observations and experience.

GS<
MS
 
Posts: 24 | Registered: 10 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
Picture of SDTuna09
posted Hide Post
IMO...

Short rod puts you in better control of the fight due to leverage....offshore tournament rods are short stiff and powerful blanks. They put a lot of hurt on the fish.

Longer rod allows the advantages as stated but you pay a price during the fight.


SDTuna
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 05 January 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pinhead
Picture of Garabaldi
posted Hide Post
The longer 7 foot rods are used in conjunction with the rail so you basically have about 5.75 feet of rod hanging over the rail which would be similar to a 6' or 6'3" rod being used "stand up" style with a harness and rod belt. The plus factors for the longer rail rods are better casting with bait and a more parabolic action which can be easier on ones back in the long run and provides some extra shock absorbtion when using low stretch Spectra with short fluoro leaders! Unless you are gorilla strong you will not use a 7' rod in a harness/belt combination (like Chark said you lose leverage and the fish gains leverage with a longer rod) but IMO, once you learn how to use the rail properly (to your leverage advantage), and rest your rod on it or against it (depending on the fighting angle needed) it is MUCH easier to pull harder and to put more pressure on larger grade tuna than using a traditional "stand up" harness and rod belt where you have way less mobility and are basically using your arms, back and body weight to pull and wind. The rail can be your best friend in a long battle with a large tuna! In the old days LR captains would yell at you if you rested your rod/reel on their rail, today they encourage it, especially now that longer fore grips and special rail rod protection sleeves are being used.

Tight lines!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Garabaldi,
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 14 August 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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I use a 9' 50-80 rod for shark here in Florida, and during the fight I can just sit on the butt and hold on. I prefer the long rod for fishing off bridges/piers, like I do, because when the shark runs under the structure, you literally sit on the 24'' butt and the rod is like a huge lever and it "springs" the fish out from under the pier. I like the technique on a big boat too. Just put the butt in your armpit and lean back!

Let this hairy monster show you how to fight the fish

What to do when things get down and dirty!

Hope this helps,
Kevin
 
Posts: 13 | Registered: 20 December 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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