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Deckhand
Captain
Picture of Agate D
posted
Went to Alaska and fished halibut with a shimano tld 30 full of 80 spectra. reel was wibbly and woggly the whole time. Which would be better--the Daiwa Sld 30 or the Penn gld 30? Reel has to be two speed and affordable.
 
Posts: 773 | Registered: 03 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
Picture of Keta
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When I lived in Alaska I found that 50lb was all that was needed to consistantly land halibut and I used a Penn 349H. If you were to drop down to 50 or 60 you could use the lighter 20's.

As for the brand, with both being around the same price I'd probably go with the Penn but Diawa makes a good product too. I'm not much help here are I.

I have seen a few Shimano graphite frame reels come apart but they were being fished far heavier, 100 or 130, than they should have.

My curent halibut reels are Avet 4/0 two speed reels.


Life's Tough, Then You Die

 
Posts: 576 | Registered: 12 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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Another great option for halibut is a Baja Special with 65# spectra. I can't recommend the TLD 20 or 30 because their frame torque under much drag.
 
Posts: 304 | Registered: 20 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
Picture of Keta
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The Baja Special is about as close to a 349H as one can find in a new reel and if I was still in Ketchikan I probably would have had one by now. 65lb Spectra is a good choice too, not much larger than 50lb but thinner than 80lb. It has far less resistance to the water and you can use lighter weights to hold bottom when fishing deep or with a fast drift.
I think Agate is wanting a two speed though.


Life's Tough, Then You Die

 
Posts: 576 | Registered: 12 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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How about a TLD20-II? Mines got 420 yds of 80# spectra with 75 yds of 50# mono. Narroer/stiffer than a TLD30-II with same gears/drags. Mine has a topless Tiburon frame so it's very strong.
 
Posts: 166 | Registered: 26 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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I liked the Avet EX40/2 for halibut but thought it was heavy and overkill; I would make the same comments on the EX30/2 except that it also costs quite a bit more. Frankly, you really don't need a two speed for halibut. Given that you may be fishing 2 or 3 pounds of lead, you don't want a gear ratio much higher than about 4 to 1 because it's too much work getting your bait off the bottom. And if the high gear isn't much more than 4 to 1, you don't need a lower gear to crank the fish up. I love to catch and eat halibut but, really, even large ones don't fight nearly as much tuna. Get one of Chark's $150 Baja Specials and save some money.
 
Posts: 304 | Registered: 20 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
Picture of Keta
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Yup, the 4/0 Avet is far heavier than is needed.
Low gear is nice when you're 48oz or 64oz lead is 300' off the bottom and still 300' from the rod. I'll drop down to low gear and keep reeling when I need a break. Other than that, a single speed at around 4:1 is all that's needed for even the largest hen halibut.

Large halibut can fight but it's in no way like a cow YFT. Unless it's in shallow water it's mostly a vertical fight. A large fish will often come up as dead weight until they get close to the boat and they head right back to the bottom. A really large halibut will do this several times.


One thing that I'll mention here, Pacific Halibut over 60lbs are generally hens and the producers of our future fish. The larger hens produce far more eggs than their smaller sisters and it's a good conservation move to either not target the big girls or cut them loose at the boat. In the 15 years I lived in KTN I only killed one halibut over 5' (5'7") and it wasn't that good eating. After that we usually cut loose the fish over 60". Our preferred size for eating was 40"-50".


Life's Tough, Then You Die

 
Posts: 576 | Registered: 12 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pro Staff
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Having been the Director of the "Alaska Grand Slam Tournament" at Kingfisher Lodge in Sitka for the past 7 years, I have extensively interviewed pretty much everybody who caught a halibut over 150 pounds during the event [about 15-20 per year].
Based on that info, my vote would go with an International 16VSX filled with 80-pound spectra.
There are just too many issues with a graphite-framed reel, no matter the brand.
Most years out tournament-best halibut is well over 200 pounds, and about every other year we get one over 300 pounds, including a 376-pounder in 2006.
Due to my stubborn personal decision to use jigs only and never bait, I don't catch as many of the bigger ones myself, with a personal best of "only" 180 pounds.
I do find that the Baja Special is perfectly sufficient for the jig fishing.
BTW, ditto on releasing the big females, they are not nearly as good on the table as the 30-60 pound "chickens".
When I wrote the tournament rules, the points are based on length to encourage safe release at boatside, and we get about 50-percent release on the over 100-pounders, and about 70-percent release on the over 200-pounders.
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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Another reason to release the big females is mercury: recent studies have shown that large halibut have quite a bit of mercury in them. That plus the fact that larger fish have more worms makes them a bit less desirable on the table, at least for me. BTW: The Baja Special does have an aluminum frame; only the sideplates are plastic. I've caught and released a number of 200 pound 'butts on a Baja Special. But my go to halibut reel is an Accurate 665 with 4 to 1 gears. Whether a 665 is worth 3 times as much as a Baja Special is not clear to me.
 
Posts: 304 | Registered: 20 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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Another good reason to cut loose the big girls is safety. I've had large fish flopping around on the deck destroying everything they hit. If one was to get between a bulkhead and the fish, parts get broken. Worse case for me was when we left the harpoon on my boat and we got a fish around 60lbs. I used two gaffs to haul the fish in and as soon as it's head cleared the water it "took off", right on chest, knocking me down. The fish ended up on me flopping around like a fish out of water...oh yea it was a fish out of water. My legs below the knees took most of the abuse and I was sore for a week.


Life's Tough, Then You Die

 
Posts: 576 | Registered: 12 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of JanZ
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I know you said two speed but I thought I'd toss in my .02

I'm fishing the Pacifics and my bigger Lings with a Penn 113HN, Aka Baja Special and so far I'm really impressed with the reel.

It has good cranking power and more than enough drag and I was able to put 330 yds of 80# Power Pro on it.

Pretty darn good reel IMHO. It's als very well built on the inside as I've had mine completely apart and it also came well oiled and greased from the factory.


Making Humboldt bay safe for bait one halibut at a time
 
Posts: 215 | Registered: 20 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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Picture of Agate D
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Steve-my wife liked the International until she saw the price. What jigs do you use? I have used big chrome tadys (#15) and huge (9")scampi-types [all flourescent] and do fair but any new ideas will be helpful.
 
Posts: 773 | Registered: 03 October 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well the price is always an issue, but a 16VSX is also an excellent reel for live baiting 75 to 150-pound yellowfin/bluefin tuna at places like Alijos Rocks, along with being the perfect trolling reel for Mexican resorts like at the East Cape for everything from striped marlin to tuna, wahoo and dorado.
You certainly would find plenty of uses to get your money's worth out of it.
As for iron-type jigs for halibut and lings, I have done best with Crippled Herrings from 7 to 10-ounces, usually with a 6-inch or 8-inch Power Grub trailer.
Best iron jig colors are all-white or green/chrome, and by far the best trailer color is "glow".
I change the hooks over to Owner "Jobu" from 7/0 to 9/0 depending on jig size.
With the 12 or 16-ounce leadheads, you need an 8 or 10-inch grub, with white being excellent, along with "glow" pretty much beating out any other colors on most days.
A lot of the skippers use 24-ounce leadheads or even larger, but that's a lot of work.
In Sitka the tidal surge is not too strong, and you can almost always make bottom with 16 ounces or less if you are using spectra.
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pinhead
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Just got back from Alaska (my first time). The first day we fished Cook Inlet for Halibut, on a charter. I'm a big Penn fan but the reels supplied to us on the trip were Avet 30lb class 2 speeds. They worked great. The higher speed was good for reeling in the 4 lb sinkers we were using and the low speed handled the fish very nicely.

Don't know what they cost, and I'll continue to buy Penn reels for myself, but I can't say a bad word about the Avets. They performed flawlessly.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: 05 January 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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