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Deckhand
posted
I am thinking of using a spinning outfit foe albacore this season on my 3 to 5 day trips. The reel I have chosen is a baitrunner 8000D. Can anyone suggest a rod to match? I will also be using it on school size yellowfin.

ThanK you,
Samada
 
Posts: 24 | Registered: 10 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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Well , I read your post, but since you insist on using a spinning outfit, I will refer you to someone else who doesn't know how to fish , maybe they can help you. Lets talk after you throw that rod in the scrap pile and start flylining LIKE EVERYONE ELSE IS DOING!!!!!!!!!!!!!-Please


sweet charity
 
Posts: 446 | Registered: 27 April 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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I like everyone on this website, you are a nice guy, but to me; your choice in gear for tuna offshore fishing is HORRIBLE!!!


sweet charity
 
Posts: 446 | Registered: 27 April 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pro Staff
Captain
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Spinning gear is fine for mid-size tuna [not large ones] as long as you remember the basic formula:
To get the equivalent quality of a conventional reel in a spinning reel, you need to spend DOUBLE.
That means that a $200 spinning reel is about equivalent to a $100 conventional reel.
One of the "super spinners" in the $600-$900 range is about equal to the many $300-$450 conventionals on the market.
Most of the issues you hear about spinning reels are actually issues with CHEAP spinning reels.
There are some inherent advantages for conventional reels [besides price] such as "feathering" your bait, and how crews have to handle your tackle when you are in a multi-angler tangle.
However, especially with anchovies, some anglers simply can't cast a conventional.
There are many things to look for in a spinner intended for tuna [even schoolies and albacore], but the first to check for is a METAL body; the flex of a graphite body reel is no big deal for calicos and such, but matters a lot offshore.
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
CharkBait Staff
Captain
Picture of Chark
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Very well put Steve. I was on the phone with a fellow yesterday. He'd signed up for a seven day trip on the Inde, had ordered (after much discussion) a JX 2 speed from us with cast control since he's only been a spinner fisherman prior to that. Well, over the weekend he got insecure about his casting ability, talked to a friend who told him not to go cast control, not to go conventional, and stick with spinners. I probably spent half an hour with him yesterday, trying to help him understand the limitations of buying a couple cheap spinners for the trip. Very confused guy, though he spent the time and money to book a seven day trip...without even going through the suggested gear for such a trip. Not sure if I got him back on track or not. May be that he simply needs to get on the boat, note that he's the odd man out and can't bring in a fish worth a darn to realize that going conventional would have been the best move. Heck, even told him that the deckies would take care of casting for him while he was gaining some rail time learning, and then he'd have the benefit of the superior drag performance of the conventional reel - and it's lower gear ratio. But, still he was confused and simply not sure what to do...was hoping some manufacturer had a try it and return it policy on their reels... Books a $2K trip to Alijos Rocks and want's to use a $150 spinner. Darn silly.

For tossing poppers, some guys really do like the EXPENSIVE spinners - that's the norm given weight of lure, gear ratio... But, even that is changing given the ease of casting newer conventional gear and the fact that we're seeing larger poppers and swimmers being produced now. That's an area we will be expanding very soon, with some GREAT DESIGNS, capable for the bigger grade tuna. And, like Steve mentioned, if its going to be a cooler water year with more 'chovies for bait, then having a spinner of quality may indeed be a very good thing to do. For albies, not a big problem using a $200 spinner effectively, but for larger grade yellowfin and even that 40# yellowtail - please invest the time to hone up your casting with a conventional reel. It's pay off will be a better trip for you. As a back-up, something to fall back on if the bait is super small, the spinner idea is fine. Try to match that up with something appropriate for the line test being fished. That's something you didn't mention in your post. But, thinking albacore you're probably working line in the 20-25# range I'm guessing. If that's the case I'd opt for a 7 footer and Seeker and Calstar have that base covered in both fiberglass and 'glass/graphite materials. Probably an 870 would do you well in either Seeker's Black Steel or Classic Series or Calstar's West Coast Series (though that model might be a bit heavy for your use - their 270 is a better 20#). If you want to step up the game a bit, go Grafighter 700L as a 25-30# rod, the 700XLH for 20#.


Great Stuff!
Mark
 
Posts: 1538 | Registered: 18 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pro Staff
Captain
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Good points all, Mark.
I do feel bad for the guy Mark talked to who is going on the Indy, the plethora of input he's getting probably has him totally locked up.
I should add that if the Penn TRQ spinners Mark has in stock are a bit too pricey, for most of the local to 4-day trips, the Penn Conquer CQR7000 and CQR8000 will do the job very nicely.
Metal body, 32 pounds of drag, superline spool, etc., etc.
The 7000 size balances well on a 270-class rod, or even on a 197-class for those true old-school 'chovy tossers.
I have caught yellowfin up to 42 pounds on the 7000, but if you want a bit more line just in case, the 8000 holds 420/50 or 350/65 braid, and works great on an 870, 670, or even a 700M type rod.
Once you hit the "Alijos Grade" tuna, a TRQ spinner has what is required mechanically.
Just bear in mind, use of a spinner means you cannot use the rail, and in fact have to make sure you clear the rail by several inches all the time.
Also, when in a major tangle or wrapped on the anchor, the crew often likes to be able to quickly flip in and out of gear while still keeping slight thumb tension on the line, or be able to keep grinding in gear against a very loose drag; both of which are much more difficult with a spinner.
Having spoken to several of the LR skippers on this topic [even those who have run "spinner" trips], they generally find they are impractical on LR boats when the fish are regularly exceeding the 100 pound range.
Not impossible, just impractical.
Throwing poppers at big 200-pound class yellowfin from a small boat in Panama is very "do-able", but that is where you definitely want a "super spinner".
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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You both have put that so "eloquently", I am impressed.


sweet charity
 
Posts: 446 | Registered: 27 April 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
CharkBait Staff
Captain
Picture of Chark
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Steve you'll be glad to know I bought an 8000 Conquer...will probably buy another maybe 5000 size for the lighter lines. Loaded mine straight up with 65# Spectra, very short leader. Like it a lot, like the servicability of the design, that's what got me to part with the $.

GS<
MS
 
Posts: 1538 | Registered: 18 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pro Staff
Captain
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Cool, can't wait to hear your report.
But tell everyone please; what rod have you chosen for it? [and why]
I would love to share your choice with others who also have the same reel.
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Deckhand
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Thanks for the input. Sounds like it was not one of my better ideas. My thinking was that I could get the bait out faster and farther with less trouble.
 
Posts: 24 | Registered: 10 June 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Pro Staff
Captain
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Not a bad idea at all; in fact a good idea under some circumstances.
Understanding what a spinning outfit will do, and what it will not do is the key.
Also not expecting an inexpensive, or even a mid-price spinning outfit to work well for pelagics is also key.
 
Posts: 248 | Registered: 25 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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Keep it real, That's why I like these guys, NO B.S. !!!!!!!! Shitmano Howdy!!!!!!!!!O.M.G. did I just do that?


sweet charity
 
Posts: 446 | Registered: 27 April 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
2nd Ticket
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As Steve and Mark have said, pick the right tool for the right job.

I fish here in the saltwater spinning capital of the world perhaps -- Florida. There is no question that the right spinning rod/reel can quickly whip tough fish. THere are not many tougher fish than a 150-200lbs tarpon and many are brought to the boat each year with 12/16/20lbs spinners.

The primary difference is that we generally fish of of smaller boats than the long-range fleet and mainly private at that. So there's no "crowd" at the rail. With mulitple hook ups, the captain designates the primary fish and the other angler(s) are told to just keep tension and let the fish run. Once the first fish is in, the Captain moves to fish #2 and so on. On our "headboats" the use of spinning tackle is for making bait and nitch fishing -- a sailfish pops up and you need to quickly toss a live bait his way. That bottomfishing rig just won't cut it.

Regardless, I don't think I'd go after school sized Yellowfin with with a Shimano Baitrunner or any graphite reel. As Steve Carson said, you'll want something with full metal construction (Frame/Sideplate/Rotor).

Good luck with your trip.

Tom
 
Posts: 37 | Registered: 20 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
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I believe the question was about gear for Albacore. In spite of the west coast bias agsinst spinners they are indeed fine for Albies and school size yellowfins. It is easier to get a bait away from the boat and given reels like the Saltist spinners, which I bought from Charkbait, it will do fine.

I will admit that it isn't a reel I would use when chasing larger grade tunas but school size albacore and YFT, they are fine. Now the obvious response is what if a larger grade BFT tuna shows up? Well most guys will already be outgunned as they will be using lighter grade conventionals and they will be screwed as well.


For by your words you will be aquitted, and by your words you will be condemned. Matt 12:37
 
Posts: 191 | Registered: 05 November 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Captain
Picture of SoCalAngler
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It appears I'm late to chime in here but maybe for others thinking the same way as Samada who are looking for a good casting setup for albacore with smaller bait I think a Penn Squall matched with a 270-8 or a 800xlh would be hard to beat in the 20-25lb range. I know it takes some times to learn how to get the maximum distance when casting with conventional gear but why not learn how too sooner rather than later?
 
Posts: 410 | Registered: 22 September 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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